Photo Credit: Peter Hellberg

Dr Jacqui Macdonald

Jacqui is a lecturer and researcher in the School of Psychology at Deakin University and from 2017 co-leads the Lifecourse and Surveillance Sciences Stream in the Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development. She is an honorary research fellow of both the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute and the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne. Jacqui works with a number of longitudinal studies including the Australian Temperament Project (ATP) Generation 3 Study based at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne. She is a contributing editor to the ARACY Fatherhood Research Bulletin. Her research explores intergenerational family processes; the development of emotions and behaviours associated with maternal and paternal caregiving; and men's family and social connectedness. Jacqui conceptualised and leads the MAPP Research Program.


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Laura Di Manno - MAPP Project Manager 

Laura coordinates all aspects of MAPP research including cohort engagement for the MAPP-5 Longitudinal study. She is a psychologist who began her Doctorate in Clinical Psychology in February 2014 at Deakin University. Her research explores the influence of family structure on mental health outcomes. Laura is dedicated to creating and maintaining meaningful connections with our valued MAPP participants.


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Associate Professor Tess Knight

Tess is an Associate Professor in the school of Psychology at Deakin University in Melbourne Australia and a registered Psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia.  Her teaching and research is primarily in developmental psychology and qualitative methods. Her research interests include barriers to social inclusion and connectedness; depression across the lifespan; and successful or positive ageing. Tess has expertise in intergenerational research and is engaged in interventions for parents of children with depression as an investigator on the Australian Research Council-funded Family Options Project.

 


Photo Credit: dimnikolov

Associate Professor Jo Williams

Jo is an Associate Professor in Epidemiology in the School of Health and Social Development at Deakin University.  She also holds the position of Principal Research Fellow at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute and is an honorary Associate Professor in the Department of Paediatrics at the University of Melbourne and in the School of Psychology at Deakin University.  She has 30 years of experience in public health epidemiology and has been a Chief Investigator on several large population based surveys, including the Melbourne Collaborative Cohort Study and the 2009 Victorian Adolescent Health and Wellbeing Survey.  She is a member of the steering committee for the national men's Health Study, Ten-to-Men.  Her research experience encompasses studies from birth to adulthood with a particular focus on associations between of social determinants of body weight and mental health.


Professor Jeannette Milgrom

Jeannette is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Melbourne and Director of Clinical and Health Psychology at the Parent-Infant Research Institute at Austin Health, Melbourne. She has published widely in the area of postnatal depression, infant mental health, parent-infant interventions and health psychology, and has more recently turned her interests to understanding fathers' psychological health during the perinatal period. Jeannette is also President of the International Marcé Society for Perinatal Mental Health, Adjunct Professor, School of Applied Psychology, Griffith University and Fellow, Australian Psychological Society.


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Associate Professor Richard Fletcher

Richard is an associate professor in the Family Action Centre at the University of Newcastle. Richard's expertise includes the design and conduct of research into fathers' role in families across diverse settings such as separated parents, new fathers, antenatal support, rough and tumble play with children, and fathers using the web. Richard's book "The Dad Factor: How the Father-Baby Bond Helps a Child for Life" (Finch 2011) has been translated into Spanish, German, Korean and Chinese. He is editor of the ARACY Fatherhood Research Bulletin and lead investigator on the innovative SMS4dads project funded by BeyondBlue, which uses app-based technology to reach and support new fathers.

 


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Professor Helen Skouteris

Helen is a Professor in Developmental Psychology and Associate Head of School (Research) in the School of Psychology at Deakin University. Helen leads the Translation Sciences Stream of the Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development (SEED). She is an expert in parental and child health and wellbeing; her research has focused particularly on familial and psychosocial determinants of childhood and maternal obesity, the antecedents and consequences of maternal body dissatisfaction during pregnancy and the postpartum, and maternal and paternal mental health and wellbeing during the prenatal period. Helen is a MAPP Research Program strategic advisor.


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Professor Craig Olsson

Craig is a Professor in Developmental Psychology and Director of the Strategic Research Centre for Social and Early Emotional Development in the School of Psychology at Deakin University. Craig is also the National Convenor of Australian Research Alliance for Children and Youth (ARACY) Longitudinal Studies Network, a network that brings together around 20 mature longitudinal studies of child and adolescent health and development in Australia and New Zealand with the aim of informing innovation in prevention practice and policy. He specialises in longitudinal and life-course research with a particular focus on child and adolescent development. Craig is a MAPP Research Program strategic advisor.


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Laura Ridler – MAPP-5 Team Leader

Laura started with MAPP as a research intern in 2016 and in 2017 joins the team as an honours student and co-ordinator of our participant contact program. In this role she trains and supervises MAPP-5 research interns.